Our Dermatology AI model use dermatoscopy generated images.

 

Dermoscopy or dermatoscopy refers to the examination of the skin using skin surface microscopy, and is also called ‘epiluminoscopy’ and ‘epiluminescent microscopy’. Derm(at)oscopy is mainly used to evaluate pigmented skin lesions. In experienced hands it can make it easier to diagnose melanoma.

Dermoscopy requires a high quality magnifying lens and a powerful lighting system (a dermatoscope). This allows examination of skin structures and patterns. There are several different lightweight, battery-powered hand-held devices. Convenient attachments allow video or still photography.

With our deep learning algorithm using dermatoscopy images we are capable to diagnose the following diseases.

Melanoma

Melanoma skin cancer can grow into and destroy nearby tissue. It can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Melanoma skin cancer is also called cutaneous melanoma and malignant melanoma of the skin.

There are 4 main types of melanoma skin cancer – superficial spreading, nodular, lentigo maligna and acral lentiginous.

A low-cost diagnostic technique called dermoscopy can help determine the potential malignancy of skin lesions—especially melanoma, in which early diagnosis is key to survival. However, providers with the specialized knowledge and experience to interpret dermoscopic findings are often limited to large academic dermatology programs and cannot be accessed by patients in underserved areas.


Melanocytic nevus

A melanocytic nevus (also known as nevocytic nevus, nevus-cell nevus and commonly as a mole)is a type of melanocytic tumor that contains nevus cells. Some sources equate the term mole with "melanocytic nevus", but there are also sources that equate the term mole with any nevus form.

The majority of moles appear during the first two decades of a person's life, with about one in every 100 babies being born with moles.Acquired moles are a form of benign neoplasm, while congenital moles, or congenital nevi, are considered a minor malformation or hamartoma and may be at a higher risk for melanoma. A mole can be either subdermal (under the skin) or a pigmented growth on the skin, formed mostly of a type of cell known as a melanocyte. The high concentration of the body's pigmenting agent, melanin, is responsible for their dark color. Moles are a member of the family of skin lesions known as nevi.


Basal cell carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma begins in the basal cells a type of cell within the skin that produces new skin cells as old ones die off.

Basal cell carcinoma often appears as a slightly transparent bump on the skin, though it can take other forms. Basal cell carcinoma occurs most often on areas of the skin that are exposed to the sun, such as your head and neck.

Most basal cell carcinomas are thought to be caused by long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight. Avoiding the sun and using sunscreen may help protect against basal cell carcinoma.


Actinic keratosis

Actinic Keratosis is a rough, scaly patch on your skin that develops from years of exposure to the sun. It's most commonly found on your face, lips, ears, back of your hands, forearms, scalp or neck.

Also known as a solar keratosis, an actinic keratosis enlarges slowly and usually causes no signs or symptoms other than a patch or small spot on your skin. These patches take years to develop, usually first appearing in people over 40.

While an actinic keratosis is not a skin cancer, it is considered to be precancerous. If left untreated, it can develop into squamous cell carcinoma. Research has shown that people with actinic keratoses have an increased risk of developing other types of skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma and melanoma.


Benign keratosis (solar lentigo / seborrheic keratosis / lichen planus-like keratosis)

A seborrheic keratosis is a common noncancerous skin growth. People tend to get more of them as they get older.

Seborrheic keratoses are usually brown, black or light tan. The growths look waxy, scaly and slightly raised. They usually appear on the head, neck, chest or back.

Seborrheic keratoses are harmless and not contagious. They don't need treatment, but you may decide to have them removed if they become irritated by clothing or you don't like how they look.


Dermatofibroma

Dermatofibromas are harmless growths within the skin that usually have a small diameter. They can vary in color, and the color may change over the years.

Dermatofibromas are firm to the touch. They are very dense, and many people say they feel like a small stone underneath or raised above the skin. Most dermatofibromas are painless.

Some people experience itching or irritation at the site of the growth, as well as tenderness. Dermatofibromas may also be called benign fibrous histiocytomas.


Vascular lesion

Vascular lesions are relatively common abnormalities of the skin and underlying tissues, more commonly known as birthmarks. There are three major categories of vascular lesions: Hemangiomas, Vascular Malformations, and Pyogenic Granulomas. While these birthmarks can look similar at times, they each vary in terms of origin and necessary treatment.


Squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the middle and outer layers of the skin.

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is usually not life-threatening, though it can be aggressive. Untreated, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Most squamous cell carcinomas of the skin result from prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, either from sunlight or from tanning beds or lamps. Avoiding UV light helps reduce your risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin and other forms of skin cancer.

To get more information regarding our Dermatology AI Platform , please get in contact and we will be happy to talk to you.